Sega Game Gear

The Game Gear was Sega's response to the Nintendo Gameboy, the Monochrome handheld designed by Nintendo's Gunpei Yokoi, and released in 1989. Sega had taken note of the general publics criticisms of the Gameboy, and wanted to make a handheld console "everything that the Game Gear wasn't".

The Game Gear was released late 1989 in Japan, 1990 in North America and as usual, us Europeans had to wait even longer, until 1991!

The most obvious different between the two consoles was the 4096 colour palette of the Game Gear, with a maximum of 32 different colours on screen at any time. The screen size was larger than the Gameboy, and was back-lit which meant that you could play it pretty much anywhere, unlike the Gameboy which needed good light.

[collapse collapsed title=read more...]

The console itself was held lengthways, with buttons on either side. This ergonomic design change made the Game Gear much easier on the hands - one criticism of the Gameboy was that it had a very cramped feel it, and many people complained of sore wrists & hands after extended game play.

The Game Gear was, in essence, a portable Sega Master System. This meant that many Master System Games could be easily ported onto the handheld console. Indeed, a Master System Converter add-on was released, which allowed any Master System Game to be plugged into the Game Gear.

Another add-on which proved to be a popular selling point was the TV Tuner. A small device which clipped to the back of the Game Gear turned the handheld console into a small portable TV, not unlike the Sony Watchman. Other add-ons included a rechargeable battery pack, screen magnifier & multilink cable, to allow two Game Gears to be connected in versus play.

With all these add-ons and advantages over the Gameboy, you would expect the Game Gear to have been the more popular of the two consoles. Unfortunately for Sega, it was not - they had overlooked one very important detail. Battery Life. In the end the deciding factor in the latest chapter of the Sega vs Nintendo war was how long the batteries lasted.

While the Game Gear did indeed have everything the Gameboy lacked, it had to pay a price for these luxuries; the average lifespan on the batteries was between 3 and 5 hours, whereas the Gameboy could easily exceed 10 hours. This was a problem suffered by many other handhelds such as the Neo-Geo pocket and the Atari Lynx - while they may have been superior in every other way, it was the simplest of factors that made the Gameboy the overall winner, and eventually the best selling console of all time.

As with all good things, the Sega Game gears came to and end in 1997. In the end, there were over 200 games released for the console, although many of them never made it out of Japan, such as the excellent Sonic Drift & Sonic Drift 2, and take-on of Super Mario Kart which included a multi-link option. Thankfully these can all be played on any Game Gear as there is no region lockout, due to there being no TV compatibility problems.

[/collapse]

Sonic the Hedgehog US

Box: 
yes
£12.00
Manual: 
yes
£12.00

Bust the video game speed barrier wide open with Sonic the Hedgehog. Blaze by in a blur using the Super Sonic Spin Attack. Loop the Loop by defying gravity. You can even spin around in a 360º rotating maze. You've never seen anything like it!

Shinobi 2 US

Box: 
yes
£12.00
Manual: 
yes
£12.00

Shinobi, the Ninja Master, returns with his team of expert warriors.  Wage a bone wrenching battle against a pack of evil ninjas who threaten the world.  Attack with 5 different ninjas.  Each has his own special Ninja Magic.

Crystal Warriors

Box: 
yes
£16.00
Manual: 
yes
£16.00

Three of the four crystals of Arliel have been stolen! Princess Iris holds the other. Help her to recapture the valuable gems!

Legend of Illusion

Box: 
yes
£40.00
Manual: 
yes
£40.00

Mickey is tricked into a perilous quest when the kingdom is threatened by an evil cloud of darkness. As temporary king, Mickey must solve riddles, find maps and avoid trickery across five magical lands to save the Tree of Life from the cowardly King Pete.

Cool Spot

Box: 
yes
£14.00
Manual: 
yes
£14.00

NO WAY! Your Cool Spot chums are locked away! YES WAY! You, as Cool Spot are here to save the day! For years, Wild Wicked Wily Wil has been trying to capture a real live SPOT to prove they exist. Now, Wil may be about to get his wish. The good news is you're here to save the day! Quit gawping over the dreamy scenery, the awesome animation and the most savoury sound around. Play man, this is the hairiest. 

Battletoads

Box: 
yes
£18.00
Manual: 
yes
£18.00

When the evil Dark Queen kidnaps your best buddy and the beautiful Princess Angelica. It's time to get real MAD, and then get EVEN! So prime up those Nuclear Knuckles, 'cuz you'll need 'em to rescue your friends and get out with your green skin intact!

NBA Jam Tournament Edition

Box: 
yes
£14.00
Manual: 
yes
£14.00

NBA JAM Tournament Edition brings you more sense-shattering slam dunking excitement than ever! More than twice as many NBA TE Superstars, more than double the secret characters, Hot Spots, Super Jam Power-Ups, and OH MY nine all-new rim-rattling slam dunks, plus all the original jams. NBA JAM Tournament Edition - it's on fire!

PGA Tour Golf 2

Box: 
yes
£12.00
Manual: 
yes
£12.00

If its on the tour, its in the game! More challenges in PGA Tour Golf 2 then before - seven courses, five tournaments, Skins game on every course, play with the pros, new EA Sports hole browser, new draw and fade meter and all new graphics.

George Formans KO Boxing

Box: 
yes
£10.00
Manual: 
yes
£10.00

You're Big George Foreman - The people's champion - and you've got an appetite for big action that only KO Boxing can satisfy.  It's a full menu of hard hitting, real ring action.

Joe Montana Football

Box: 
yes
£14.00
Manual: 
yes
£14.00

American football is here! Play the game with Joe Montana, the highest rated Quarterback in NFL history.

Syndicate content