Sega Megadrive

The Sega Megadrive was released in Japan in November 1988 and was the first 16-bit video games console. The Sega Master System (the predecessor to the Sega Megadrive) had declined in popularity due to the increase in 16-bit computers such as the Atari ST and the Commodore Amiga, and Sega had lost the battle with the Nintendo Corporation and its Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). Having already enjoyed considerable success with 16-bit arcade games such as Space Harrier and Outrun, Sega decided to rush out the new Megadrive console ahead of their rivals Nintendo, and the Super Famicom (Super Nintendo) which they had been secretly developing.

Released almost one year later, in October 1989, the Sega Megadrive was known as the Sega Genesis in the USA and Canada. A further year later, just in time for Christmas the Sega Megadrive landed in Europe and the whole world had now been introduced to 16-bit console gaming. However, despite being first off the mark with its next generation console, and having reasonable sales in early 1991 Sega was still losing out to the still popular NES. That was until a Spiky haired blue hedgehog made an appearance and changed everything!

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The demand for the Sega Megadrive hit the roof as everyone wanted to play the latest game - Sonic the Hedgehog. For the first time, Sega had knocked Nintendo off the number one spot in the video game markets of Europe and North America. Nintendo responded by rushing forward the release of its Super Nintendo (SNES) but it was too late and the Sega Megadrive had established itself as the number one choice of video games console. Nintendo still remained more popular in Japan - which had always been considered its stronghold, but the shake-up in the western markets was a considerable embarrassment for the video games giant.

The Sega Megadrive underwent a transformation a few years later and the Sega Megadrive 2 was released. The console was smaller, and had the headphone jack and volume control removed. In addition to this the TMSS (Trade Mark Security System) was introduced which prevented the playing of imported cartridges through a series of hardware and software checks.

The Sega Mega CD went on sale in Japan in December 1991. It had an additional processor, more RAM, a new Sound Chip and an (obvious) bonus was the ability to play normal music CD's as CD players were still relatively new at this time. As usual, one year later, the unit went on sale in the US, with a slightly better game line up which included the excellent Sewer Shark. Unfortunately for Sega, it was the price of the consoles that prevented them from gaining popularity, despite the fact that many excellent RPG's went onto Mega-CD only, compared to the Sega Megadrive the unit had very limited worldwide success.

In 1993 Sega started to fall behind Nintendo in the 3D development field. Nintendo had wowed the world with Starwing (Starfox in the US) and the SuperFX Chip. Initially Sega had developed the SVP Adapter (Super Virtua Play) with Hitachi, and this had been incorporated into many new arcade releases including the massive hit, Virtua Fighter. Virtua Racer, released in 1994, was the only 3D polygon game that made it to the Sega Megadrive and had the SVP Adapter incorporated into the game cartridge - similar to the SuperFX chip on the Nintendo.

Sega released the Sega 32X add-on in 1995 which incorporated the SVP capabilities into the new base unit via twin Hitachi processors and an overhaul of the internal architecture. The unit plugged into the existing cartridge slot, and had it own power supply and video feed. Existing games could be played in the new slot, as well as beefed up 32X games which now featured 3D processing, better graphics, better sound and faster game play. The best of the bunch were Star Wars Arcade, Knuckles Chaotix and Virtua Fighter.

Despite this last ditch attempt by Sega to save the Megadrive, its popularity dwindled - largely due to the overwhelming success of the Sony Playstation. The machine was officially discontinued in 1998, and was replaced by Sega's true 32bit machine, the Sega Saturn. Although the Sega Megadrive never matched the Super Nintendo's worldwide success, it certainly gave it a run for its money, especially in the United States and Great Britain. Boasting a ten year history and a back catalogue of more than a thousand games including the Sonic series, Ecco the Dolphin and Streets of Rage games, the Sega Megadrive is certainly a console which will not be forgotten for many years.

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Bonanza Brothers

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Box: 
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£16.00
Manual: 
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£16.00

Enter Robo and Mobo, the Bonanza Brothers are the clumsiest thieves around. They're in deep trouble now, and they may need your help to avoid becoming jailbirds!

Bodycount

Notes: 
This game requires the Menacer Light Gun or the Sega Mouse
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£0.00
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Battle with enemies over five explosive levels. Ideal for play with the Menacer or the Sega Mouse.

BOB

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£8.00
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£8.00

Enroute to a close encounter with his dream babe, B.O.B's luck runs out. Light years away from his home, he wraps his Dad's space convertible around an asteroid. But Pop's wrath is nothing compared to the unfriendly neighbourhood he finds himself stranded in. Help B.O.B. blast his way through the alien goon squads and onward to the rendezvous with his galactic babe!

Bloodshot

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£20.00
Manual: 
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£20.00

Superbly smooth 3D graphics and one or two player split screen action as you run through an alien troop carrier containing a deadly cargo of pre-programmed killing machines. Your weapons include the surgically inserted 'Battle Frenzy Chip' which gives you super strength, lightning reflexes and an insatiable desire to kill; a condition known as 'Bloodshot'. Your partner had better watch his back.

Biohazard Battle

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Notes: 
This game is missing its instruction book
Box: 
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£9.00
Manual: 
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£9.00

Grotesque biological horrors terrorize the planet Avaron. Command Plasma Rings, Implosion Pods and Seeker Lasers to blast mutoids into oblivion. Aim white-hot fireballs at mega amoebas and nuclear crabs. Cut down poisonous electro-worms and gut grabbing insects.

Blades of Vengeance

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This game is missing its instruction book.
Box: 
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£9.00
Manual: 
yes
£9.00

Amulets, potions and spells to build your powers.  Superb arcade graphics, feel and colours.  Three great characters to choose from.  Eight amazing levels with gruesome end guardians.

Bill Walsh College Football

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£0.00
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£0.00

New four way play, 2 vs 1, 2 vs 2, 3 vs 1 or even 4 players vs the Megadrive! New large, detailed player graphics bring a new level of realism to American Football. Easy to use, one-step play calling interface. Reverse angle replay. Bluff your opponent to disguise your play! Hurdle your way out of trouble! Real College Football rules, formations and strategies - including thrilling Triple Option plays and the 2-point conversion. Select Automatic or Manual pass receiving modes. Fan songs and exuberant cheerleaders heighten the atmosphere. 

Beavis and Butthead

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£24.00
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£24.00

We were gonna go to this GWAR concert. Then Andersons stupid dog like chewed up the tickets. Now you've gotta help us find the pieces or somebody's gonna pay for it. Probably Beavis.

Battletoads

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£36.00
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£36.00

When the evil Dark Queen kidnaps your best buddy and the beautiful Princess Angelica.  It's time to get real MAD, and then get EVEN!  So prime up those Nuclear Knuckles, 'cuz you'll need 'em to rescue your friends and get out with your green skin intact!

Batman Returns

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£10.00
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£10.00

The Penguin has Gotham City gripped in his twisted flippers. Helping him are the deranged Red Triangle Circus Gang and the evil Catwoman, among others. Pitch deadly Batarangs, track down thugs in the Batmobile - use all available weapons to battle through the mobs and reach the showdown in The Penguin's Lair!

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