Holiday Notice

Hello everyone. We are shortly moving to a new, bigger premises so website ordering will be closed for the next month while we move everything to our new building, reorganise and do a full stock take. We will be open again at the start of November. Many thanks. Console Passion

Sega Dreamcast

The Sega Dreamcast (Japanese: ドリームキャスト; code-named "Blackbelt", "Dural" and "Katana" during development) was Sega's last video game console.

When the time came to design the successor to the Sega Saturn, the new President of Sega, Shoichiro Irimajiri, took the unusual step of hiring an outsider. He hired Tatsuo Yamamoto from IBM Austin to head a skunkworks group to develop the next-generation console. However, it soon became apparent that the existing Japanese hardware group led by Hideki Sato did not want to relinquish control of hardware, and so there were two competing designs led by two different groups.

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The Japanese group led by Hideki Sato settled on an Hitachi SH4 processor with a PowerVR graphics processor developed by VideoLogic (now Imagination Technologies) and manufactured by NEC. This was originally codenamed "White Belt". The first Japanese prototype boards were silkscreened "Guppy" and the later ones "Katana".

The US skunkworks group (in a secret suite at the 303 Twin Dolphin Drive building) led by Tatsuo Yamamoto settled on an IBM/Motorola PowerPC 603e processor with a 3Dfx Voodoo 2 graphics processor, which was originally codenamed "Black Belt". The first US prototype boards were silkscreened "Shark" (in response to the Japanese "Guppy"). The Japanese hardware was codenamed "Dural", then later, Katana. This codename was only used by The US hardware team called themselves the "Black Belt team".

In July 1997, it was decided that the Japanese "Katana" would be the chosen format, renamed Dreamcast. In September 1997, 3Dfx filed a lawsuit against Sega and NEC (later including VideoLogic), claiming "breach of contract", although they later settled.

The Dreamcast was released on November 27, 1998 in Japan, on September 9, 1999 in the United States (the date 9/9/99 featured heavily in US promotion) and on October 14, 1999 in Europe. The tagline used to promote the console in the US was, "It's thinking", and in Europe "Up to 6 Billion Players". The vagueness of these campaigns and almost total lack of any in game footage has been touted as one of the reasons for the Dreamcast's eventual downfall. Many Americans knew that the Dreamcast was coming, but didn't know what one was.

The Dreamcast was the first console to include a built-in modem and Internet support for online gaming. It enjoyed brisk sales in its first season and was one of Sega's most successful hardware units. In the United States alone, a record 200,000 units had been pre-ordered before launch and Sega sold 500,000 consoles in just two weeks (including 225,000 sold on the first 24 hours which became a video game record until the PlayStation 2 launched a year later). In fact, due to brisk sales and hardware shortages, Sega was unable to fulfil all of the advance orders. Sega confirmed that it made $98.4 million on combined hardware and software sales with the Dreamcast with its September 9, 1999 launch. Sega even compared the record figure to the opening day gross of Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, which made $28.5 million during the first 24 hours in theatres.

Before the launch in the United States, Sega had already taken the extra step in displaying Dreamcast capabilities in stores nationwide. Much like the PlayStation's launch in North America, the displays of titles such as Soul Calibur, Sonic Adventure, Power Stone and Hydro Thunder helped the Dreamcast succeed in the first year. Although Electronic Arts declined to support the Dreamcast which included the omission of its popular sports games (due in part to EA's losses from the past Sega Saturn), Sega Sports titles helped to fill that void.

In April 1999, Sony announced its PlayStation 2, designed to be backwards-compatible with the older PlayStation, and released the unit in Japan in March 2000. Sony's press release, despite being a year ahead of the launch of the PS2, was enough to divert a lot of attention from Sega. Even though Sega touted the Dreamcast's online capabilities (the PS2 would not go online until late 2002), American public attention was focused upon the PlayStation 2's ability to play DVDs (the DVD format did not catch on in Japan until after the release of the PS2 as VCD/SVCD were established standards). Electronic Arts also announced its support for the PS2. This, combined with the fact that SEGA had dropped support for the Saturn and did not offer backwards compatibility led to poorer sales in America (Sega CD and 32X are good examples of this).

On January 31, 2001, Sega announced that production of Dreamcast hardware was to be discontinued by March of that year, although the 50 to 60 titles still in production would be published. The last North American release was NHL 2K2, which was released in February of 2002. With the company announcing no plans to develop a next-generation successor to the Dreamcast, this was Sega's last foray into the home console business. By the time Sega decided to cease development of the Dreamcast, about 10 million consoles had been sold. Though the Dreamcast was officially discontinued in early 2001, commercial games were still developed and released afterwards, particularly in Japan.

Many consider the critically acclaimed arcade shooter Ikaruga developed by Treasure to be the Dreamcast swan song. It was released in September 2002 in Japan only after a large amount of speculation on the game's fate; its US release was on the Nintendo GameCube in April 2003. Hacked unreleased games like Propeller Arena and Half-Life continued to become available to the public by program decoders like Echelon. On February 24, 2004, Sega released their final Dreamcast game, Puyo Pop Fever, although a small number of third-party games are still being released, such as Trizeal, released in April 2005, or the release of Rajirugi and soon-to-be-released Under Defeat.

Despite its short lifespan, the Dreamcast is still a very popular and highly-regarded console among many fans due to its impressive library of both mainstream and quirky titles. It is even starting to become a cult classic, as the system is getting harder to find (in fact, although the Dreamcast was officially discontinued in January 2001, Sega continued to produce the console for a short time afterwards due to rising demand, not least among collectors and hard-core fans).

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ECW Hardcore Revolution

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Often imitated, never duplicated, ECW Hardcore Revolution takes you to hell and back with the most intense hardcore wrestling action the human body can endure. Debut of over fourty hardcore EVW stars. Real gutter mouth crowd chants and commentary from ECW's Joey Styles. Acclaims revolutionary Create-a-Wrestler.

ESPN International Track and Field

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£9.00
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£9.00

The original button basher is back and it's better than ever for Dreamcast. International Track & Field is an old favourite for a new era. Awesome events include: One hundred metres, hurdles, javelin, weightlifting, pole vault, clay pigeon shooting. and more. Choose between Trial and Championship mode. Marvel at the breathtaking motion capture. Better the controller until your fingers bleed. Beat your mates in four player mode.

Ecco the Dolphin - Defender of the Future

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£14.00
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£14.00

Plunge into the tropical waters of the Isle of Tranquillity. As Ecco, an energetic young dolphin you will explore mysterious locations that span four alternative timelines. Seek the majestic city of Atlantis, monument to the civilisation built by humans and dolphins. Encounter sea creatures and come face to face with alien forces as you seek to defend the Earth and history itself! Realistically simulated underwater world. Intelligent animals with life like animation.

ECW Anarchy Rulz

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£7.00
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All new control system. First ever blistering Brimstone match, plus music from Dope & One minute silence! Backlot brawls, all new finishers and two man commentary! Never-before seen hardcore table matches! RVD, Tanaka, The Sandman and over sixty extreme wrestlers.

Dynamite Cop

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£44.00
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£44.00

You are a special forces agent sent to rescue the Presidents daughter who is held hostage on a cruise ship. Fulfil your mission by any means necessary - punch, kick and use whatever weapons come to hand. This action packed 3D beat-em-up with fully interactive environments will certainly keep the adrenaline pumping.

Dragons Blood

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Hack N Slash your way through 15 gargantuan levels of medieval, blood soaked mayhem. Using your warrior instincts, explore fantasy environments whilst engaging yourself against 30 of your fiercest enemies. You'll need to stay sharp by utilising a blend of spell casting and heavy handed, gory combat. Watch out though. you could lose your head.

Ducati World-Racing Challenge

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£10.00
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£10.00

Experience the thrill, speed and sheer excitement of racing the worlds number 1 motorcycle brand with Ducati World. Race against the four-time World Champion Carl Fogarty and win his bike! Race some of the most prestigious Ducati bikes ever created from the 1960's Daytona 350 to today's 748 and 996. Ducati Life - nothing gets you closer to the real thing. Earn your licence, buy classic and modern bikes, leathers, helmets and customise and upgrade your bike.

Donald Duck - Quack Attack

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Donald Duck is on a quest. He has to save the kidnapped daisy from the clutches of Merlock, the evil magician. And, if this wasn't bad enough, he has to hurry; Donald must reach Daisy before his cousin Gladstone Gander! Master Donald Ducks quacky emotions and explosive temper in his hyperactive humorous adventure.

Dragon Riders - Chronicle of Pern

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£30.00
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£30.00

See for the first time the magical world of Pern. In the shattered world of Pern only one can be saviour. It is now your calling to seek out the new Weyrwoman to ride the mighty Gold Dragon before Pern is forever destroyed. A vast storyline featuring one hundred and twenty richly detailed locations and one hundred and seventy characters to seek and question. Use your wits, your first, and your weapons to defeat your foes. Improve your dragon's powers to unravel the many mysteries of Pern.

Dino Crisis

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£24.00
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£24.00

From the creators of the Resident Evil series comes Dino Crisis as 3D game of panic, terror and FEAR!" You play Regina, a government agent sent to a remote island to track down a missing professor who has been conducted suspicious experiments. You discover that the island runs rampant with dinosaurs, including Velociraptors and T-Rex's. Think and move fast as you do battle with hordes of dinosaurs hiding around every corner.

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