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We are currently away exhibiting at PLAY Expo Blackpool and all our stock is packed away for that event. We will be back on Monday 21st October and will be able to fulfil and orders and respond to any enquiries after this date. Many thanks!

Sega Megadrive

The Sega Megadrive was released in Japan in November 1988 and was the first 16-bit video games console. The Sega Master System (the predecessor to the Sega Megadrive) had declined in popularity due to the increase in 16-bit computers such as the Atari ST and the Commodore Amiga, and Sega had lost the battle with the Nintendo Corporation and its Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). Having already enjoyed considerable success with 16-bit arcade games such as Space Harrier and Outrun, Sega decided to rush out the new Megadrive console ahead of their rivals Nintendo, and the Super Famicom (Super Nintendo) which they had been secretly developing.

Released almost one year later, in October 1989, the Sega Megadrive was known as the Sega Genesis in the USA and Canada. A further year later, just in time for Christmas the Sega Megadrive landed in Europe and the whole world had now been introduced to 16-bit console gaming. However, despite being first off the mark with its next generation console, and having reasonable sales in early 1991 Sega was still losing out to the still popular NES. That was until a Spiky haired blue hedgehog made an appearance and changed everything!

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The demand for the Sega Megadrive hit the roof as everyone wanted to play the latest game - Sonic the Hedgehog. For the first time, Sega had knocked Nintendo off the number one spot in the video game markets of Europe and North America. Nintendo responded by rushing forward the release of its Super Nintendo (SNES) but it was too late and the Sega Megadrive had established itself as the number one choice of video games console. Nintendo still remained more popular in Japan - which had always been considered its stronghold, but the shake-up in the western markets was a considerable embarrassment for the video games giant.

The Sega Megadrive underwent a transformation a few years later and the Sega Megadrive 2 was released. The console was smaller, and had the headphone jack and volume control removed. In addition to this the TMSS (Trade Mark Security System) was introduced which prevented the playing of imported cartridges through a series of hardware and software checks.

The Sega Mega CD went on sale in Japan in December 1991. It had an additional processor, more RAM, a new Sound Chip and an (obvious) bonus was the ability to play normal music CD's as CD players were still relatively new at this time. As usual, one year later, the unit went on sale in the US, with a slightly better game line up which included the excellent Sewer Shark. Unfortunately for Sega, it was the price of the consoles that prevented them from gaining popularity, despite the fact that many excellent RPG's went onto Mega-CD only, compared to the Sega Megadrive the unit had very limited worldwide success.

In 1993 Sega started to fall behind Nintendo in the 3D development field. Nintendo had wowed the world with Starwing (Starfox in the US) and the SuperFX Chip. Initially Sega had developed the SVP Adapter (Super Virtua Play) with Hitachi, and this had been incorporated into many new arcade releases including the massive hit, Virtua Fighter. Virtua Racer, released in 1994, was the only 3D polygon game that made it to the Sega Megadrive and had the SVP Adapter incorporated into the game cartridge - similar to the SuperFX chip on the Nintendo.

Sega released the Sega 32X add-on in 1995 which incorporated the SVP capabilities into the new base unit via twin Hitachi processors and an overhaul of the internal architecture. The unit plugged into the existing cartridge slot, and had it own power supply and video feed. Existing games could be played in the new slot, as well as beefed up 32X games which now featured 3D processing, better graphics, better sound and faster game play. The best of the bunch were Star Wars Arcade, Knuckles Chaotix and Virtua Fighter.

Despite this last ditch attempt by Sega to save the Megadrive, its popularity dwindled - largely due to the overwhelming success of the Sony Playstation. The machine was officially discontinued in 1998, and was replaced by Sega's true 32bit machine, the Sega Saturn. Although the Sega Megadrive never matched the Super Nintendo's worldwide success, it certainly gave it a run for its money, especially in the United States and Great Britain. Boasting a ten year history and a back catalogue of more than a thousand games including the Sonic series, Ecco the Dolphin and Streets of Rage games, the Sega Megadrive is certainly a console which will not be forgotten for many years.

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Demolition Man

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One cop. One criminal. One mission: destroy the other man first! You're John Spartan, freshly thawed from the San Angeles cryoprison. Armed with shotguns, magnum handguns and grenade, hunt Simon Phoenix through ten explosive levels.

Death and Return of Superman

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£0.00
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Brace yourself for a hard hitting fight to the finish that lets you relive the classic DC Comic book series. As Superman, fight for your life against the mighty Doomsday, the vile distributor of death and destruction! Then, control the destiny of the four supermen - each claiming to be the one true superman!

Decap Attack

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Box: 
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£20.00
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£20.00

Max D. Cap has taken control of Body Island by splitting it into pieces. Dr. Frank N Stein has created you, Chuck D. Head, to battle D. Cap's wave of creatures and put all the pieces back together again.

David Robinsons Supreme Court

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£4.00
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£4.00

Play big time basketball with David Robinson, one of the top centres in the game today. Slam dunks, fast breaks, tenacious defence - all the thrills of real big league basketball action!

Davis Cup World Tour

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£6.00
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£6.00

This super realistic action packed tennis sim has everything you could want including tournament competitions, fantastic animated graphics, two player split screen action, video replays, real speech and mid-match stat screens with player rankings. It's game, set and match to Davis Cup World Tour.

Dark Castle

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This game is missing its instruction book
Box: 
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£9.00
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£9.00

Climb the ramparts of Dark Castle and dethrone the Black Knight. Explore fourteen rooms filled with zombies, rats and dive-bombing vultures! Discover healing elixirs and the magic shield to help you on your quest.

Daffy Duck in Hollywood

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£10.00
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£10.00

Super-Hero Daffy Duck PI armed with his bubble-gun, sleuths his way around six different levels of film sets to recover Yosemite Sam's stolen movie awards. Amazing cartoon quality graphics and animation will pull you into Daffy's wacky, quacky adventure.

Cyborg Justice

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Notes: 
This game is missing its instruction book
Box: 
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£9.00
Manual: 
no
£9.00

Read-out on cyborg 127: Our memory delete on cyborg 127n was unsuccessful. the cyborg still as all files on Cydrek Federation's sneak attack on the Galactic Unity. The cyborg was once3 a Galactic Unity defence agent and will try to stop our plans. All units on alert. Destroy cyborg 127. Destroy!

Cyberball

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£9.00
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£9.00

Bash your way to the goal post in Cyberball, the national sport of the 21st Century. Massive robots grapple for yardage on this metal crunching gridiron of the future. And when the action gets critical, the ball explodes!

Crue Ball

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£10.00
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Blistering soundtrack features three Motley Crue hits. Nine rippin' volume levels (that's play levels, dude) with a special appearance by Motley Crue's Alister Fiend. Created by designers of real Pinball.

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