Sega Megadrive

The Sega Megadrive was released in Japan in November 1988 and was the first 16-bit video games console. The Sega Master System (the predecessor to the Sega Megadrive) had declined in popularity due to the increase in 16-bit computers such as the Atari ST and the Commodore Amiga, and Sega had lost the battle with the Nintendo Corporation and its Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). Having already enjoyed considerable success with 16-bit arcade games such as Space Harrier and Outrun, Sega decided to rush out the new Megadrive console ahead of their rivals Nintendo, and the Super Famicom (Super Nintendo) which they had been secretly developing.

Released almost one year later, in October 1989, the Sega Megadrive was known as the Sega Genesis in the USA and Canada. A further year later, just in time for Christmas the Sega Megadrive landed in Europe and the whole world had now been introduced to 16-bit console gaming. However, despite being first off the mark with its next generation console, and having reasonable sales in early 1991 Sega was still losing out to the still popular NES. That was until a Spiky haired blue hedgehog made an appearance and changed everything!

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The demand for the Sega Megadrive hit the roof as everyone wanted to play the latest game - Sonic the Hedgehog. For the first time, Sega had knocked Nintendo off the number one spot in the video game markets of Europe and North America. Nintendo responded by rushing forward the release of its Super Nintendo (SNES) but it was too late and the Sega Megadrive had established itself as the number one choice of video games console. Nintendo still remained more popular in Japan - which had always been considered its stronghold, but the shake-up in the western markets was a considerable embarrassment for the video games giant.

The Sega Megadrive underwent a transformation a few years later and the Sega Megadrive 2 was released. The console was smaller, and had the headphone jack and volume control removed. In addition to this the TMSS (Trade Mark Security System) was introduced which prevented the playing of imported cartridges through a series of hardware and software checks.

The Sega Mega CD went on sale in Japan in December 1991. It had an additional processor, more RAM, a new Sound Chip and an (obvious) bonus was the ability to play normal music CD's as CD players were still relatively new at this time. As usual, one year later, the unit went on sale in the US, with a slightly better game line up which included the excellent Sewer Shark. Unfortunately for Sega, it was the price of the consoles that prevented them from gaining popularity, despite the fact that many excellent RPG's went onto Mega-CD only, compared to the Sega Megadrive the unit had very limited worldwide success.

In 1993 Sega started to fall behind Nintendo in the 3D development field. Nintendo had wowed the world with Starwing (Starfox in the US) and the SuperFX Chip. Initially Sega had developed the SVP Adapter (Super Virtua Play) with Hitachi, and this had been incorporated into many new arcade releases including the massive hit, Virtua Fighter. Virtua Racer, released in 1994, was the only 3D polygon game that made it to the Sega Megadrive and had the SVP Adapter incorporated into the game cartridge - similar to the SuperFX chip on the Nintendo.

Sega released the Sega 32X add-on in 1995 which incorporated the SVP capabilities into the new base unit via twin Hitachi processors and an overhaul of the internal architecture. The unit plugged into the existing cartridge slot, and had it own power supply and video feed. Existing games could be played in the new slot, as well as beefed up 32X games which now featured 3D processing, better graphics, better sound and faster game play. The best of the bunch were Star Wars Arcade, Knuckles Chaotix and Virtua Fighter.

Despite this last ditch attempt by Sega to save the Megadrive, its popularity dwindled - largely due to the overwhelming success of the Sony Playstation. The machine was officially discontinued in 1998, and was replaced by Sega's true 32bit machine, the Sega Saturn. Although the Sega Megadrive never matched the Super Nintendo's worldwide success, it certainly gave it a run for its money, especially in the United States and Great Britain. Boasting a ten year history and a back catalogue of more than a thousand games including the Sonic series, Ecco the Dolphin and Streets of Rage games, the Sega Megadrive is certainly a console which will not be forgotten for many years.

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Classic Collection

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The classic collection contains four, yes four, of the very best games available for the Sega Megadrive - Altered Beast, Alex Kidd in the Enchanted Castle, Flicky and the awesome Gunstar Heroes.

Chuck Rock 2 - Son of Chuck

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Eighteen months after his victory over Gary Gritter, Chuck Rock is now the owner of the hugely successful 'Chuck Motors' and has become a father. Kidnapped by his evil enemy Brick Jagger, Chuck Rock is likely to become Chuck Dust unless someone rescues him. A sudden crash as Chuck Junior busts from his play pen "Goo Goo Gaa Gaa, I'll be back".

Chuck Rock

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Unga Bunga! Chuck Rock's wife, Ophelia, has been captured by that no-good Gary Gritter. Can Chuck belly-butt his way through dozens of deranged dinosaurs and surprises galore? Or is his love destined to end up on the rocks?

Chiki Chiki Boys

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No one in peaceful Alurea was ready when the Monsters attacked! Mobs of grimy creatures swarmed over the land. Only the Chiki Chiki Boys survived. Can these twin princes win back their country from the nasty gnarlies of the Monster Palace.

Chaos Engine

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The bizarre, monster making Chaos Engine: it'll take some beating! Thug, Mercenary, Scientist, Gentleman, Navvie or Brigand; choose two to rampage across four deviously deadly worlds of fiendishly fierce blow 'em up action!

Cheese Cat-astrophe starring Speedy Gonzalez

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Sylvester's alter-ego, the dastardly Dr Cheesefinger, has "kidnapped" the cheese supply and Speedy Gonzales' girlfriend, Carmel. Can this 'Speedy Mouse' outwit the callous cat and rescue the village cheese supply?

Chakan

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Unleash Chakan's razor sharp twin swords and the arcane knowledge of alchemy on the beasts of the dark. Chakan, the forever wandering soul, must defeat every last bit of supernatural evil to find peace.

Champions World Class Soccer Endorsed by Ryan Giggs

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Go for the goals! Thirty-two international teams compete in hard-charging soccer action! Advanced player control - shooting, corners and throw-ins. Realistic bicycle kicks, headers, traps, passes and much more. Referee calls - fouls, penalties, yellow and red cards.

Centurian - Defender of Rome

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Features Real time land battles: Roman Armies and Hannibal's elephants, Real time Sea Battles, Fire Catapults, launch arrows, ram your enemy, Action Packed Chariot races and the chance to seduce the beautiful Cleopatra.

Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse

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The search is on! Mickey is on the trail of a wicked Witch named Mizrabel, who has kidnapped Minnie. Mickey must find seven gems to save Minnie. Run, leap and bounce with Mickey, slinging apples and marbles at enemies. Then, get ready to challenge your most dangerous foe. Witch Mizrabel herself!

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